Preparing for Reassessment (Standards Based Learning Slow Chat)

@informed_members @Certified_Educators

@Darcey_teasdale, @d.vendramin, and I are continuing the conversation about standards-based learning.

Not all students reach all milestones at the same time, making reassessment can be a powerful tool. How many times do your students usually attempt re-assessment in a standard? How do you prepare them for it?

image

3 Likes

There are just a handful of students that will go through the process to retest (even if it is to just earn a couple points back).
I rarely have students re-assess more than once (usually because they don’t need to)

In order to take a re-assessment, my students have to fill out a reflection form.

They identify what area they most struggled with (decimals, mixed numbers, percent of a number, etc. ) - This is especially helpful with Saxon Math,where each test covers a dozen different lessons/skills.
They think about why that skill is challenging for them. They reflect on how they prepared for the first test (in Middle School the most common reason is that they didn’t really study or practice for the test…of course they “forgot” or were “too busy”).
They then have to come up with a plan to relearn or to study the material that they struggled with. (One option is to attend a study session with me, before school or during a study hall time).
They have to get this approved by me and have a quick conference with me. Once they have proof of putting in the effort to better understand the material, we set a time for them to re-test.

I would love to see more students choose to re-test when they aren’t satisfied with their grade though.

4 Likes

@Darcey_Teasdale Your answer is similar to what we have as policy for quiz corrections. In order for a student to request a re-take of a quiz, they must do at least one of the following:

  • Provide a written statement from a guardian that witnessed the student studying the material.
  • Comie in one or more times after school to get help from a teacher.
  • Complete a quiz correction blog that includes corrected answers with an explanation of why the answers are correct.

Usually, there are two types of students that actually request a grade modification/retake. The ones that are just shy of the 100% or the ones that completely bombed the original assessment.

I would also love to see more of the middle ground students attempt a quiz re-take and continue to look for ways to encourage them to do so.

On the other hand, and one of the reasons why I like Formative with its tagging of standards, use of the totals view and being able to provide feedback - as we work through the different assignments leading up to what I call a Mastery quest (test), I am able to see where students, pull small groups or reteach to the whole class, which helps me make informed decisions about what they need to “prepare for assessment”.

2 Likes

I like to give them as many times they need, but they have to show me that they are more prepared and come on their own time. I like to use formative and the show your work feature as on of the ways to see if they are ready. I do get some that will take the time to prepare for the a re-evaluation but still not as many committed to go through the process.

2 Likes

Most of my students don’t like assesment. They get a little bit nervous and I’m tryung to find alternative ways of assessment like using portfolios etc

2 Likes

This is awesome!
I do something similar, especially in my social studies classroom. I provide several types of activities students can use to show their understanding (creative writing (journal entry), timeline, cartoons, advertisements, maps, videos, etc) and let them suggest their personal preference on what they know.
With in class work time and a medium each individual student is comfortable with, formal assessments at the end of the unit are less stressful overall and often give a better understanding of what the Ss know/are able to do.

3 Likes

The majority of my students only take one reassessment per concept. However, I have a few students who reassessed on a particular standard multiple times because they were not satisfied with their score.

In order to reassess, students must come to me during Power Hour (our lunch period) and go over their first assessment. After we discuss their mistakes and misconceptions, I then direct them back to our review Formatives. Once a student has completed the review Formative, then they are able to come in and reassess the standard.

Going forward into next year, I plan on creating more structure for reassessments. I am in the process of creating clear expectations that I can give to my students. I teach Honors so I struggle with keeping them accountable for their own learning. Any suggestions as to what has worked in your classrooms?

2 Likes

Most of my students reassess only once. My assessments tend to be leveled and they may only need to demonstrate understanding of a certain portion. I typically give students a week to get the reassessment scheduled. They have to apply and get a parent signature along with some reflection of what went wrong and what can be done to show me that you know it now. Most often my redo’s are verbal with a piece of whiteboard and markers handy. It is very clear immediately if students understand concepts with that. I used to allow retakes anytime, that was a mistake, now I’ve narrowed that to either a morning or afternoon of my choosing. There are exceptions to that, but mostly it happens Wednesday AM and Thursday PM.

3 Likes

Our Algebra 1 PLC decided to let students retest after they completed more practice problems. One teacher in the PLC seemed to have a more advanced group of students and her retesting method might work with your Honors group.

Our assessments cover multiple targets, and while most of us allowed students to retest on all the targets tested, Kellie chose to only allow her advanced group the opportunity to retest on ONE target for that test. She found that it helped her students to focus more BEFORE the test because they could only redo part of the test in order to raise their grades. She also gave them a retest deadline.

2 Likes

I love this idea!
Do you know - Did she make individual tests that only showed the part that each student was re-doing or did she have the same re-test and just grade the part that they were able to re-test or the students knew they could only do work/answers for one part and they chose the one part to do? What did she find worked best?

1 Like

@Darcey_Teasdale our PLC uses common assessments. The unit assessment has all the concepts, but the retests are by individual learning concept. So each retest is a focused mini-test. We find that it not only helps the students by reducing test anxiety and increasing the likelihood of a student actually taking a retest, but it also helps the teacher by reducing the grading time. :slight_smile:

2 Likes

Students may request the option of creating a multimedia project explaining the assessed standard in place or a re-test. Here’s an example 3 students completed together. (they went above and beyond, even staying after school)

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7Z0xjAkJTz2ZEc1WnZmc2ZCMVE/view?usp=sharing.

2 Likes

The kids did a good job! I used to something similar to this when I taught middle school. Now that I teach high school, I just don’t have the time for all the students to do a project like this… especially since many don’t have internet access as home. I do plan on having extension activities for those who accomplish the designated tasks of the day. This would be a great extension and it would count for XP points for my gamification levels. :slight_smile:

1 Like