What does flipped learning look like in your classroom?

Hey everyone! @chase.kirkpatrick & @pflynn are hosting a slow chat about Flipped Learning this week and I am jumping in to help post Q2!

We’d love to hear what flipped learning looks like in your classroom! What did it look like when you first started? Have you added new elements / your own spin on it? What “hacks” have you discovered? We can’t wait to hear from you!

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@informed_members @Certified_Educators

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I would highly recommend putting your lesson videos into the Edpuzzle online tool. You can set them so the students cannot skip through them, and it also doesn’t allow them to click out of the browser tab without stopping the video. This was a major issue with my students when I first began flipping. They would fast forward through the Precalc lesson videos just to fill in the notes without actually listening to my explanations. In addition, you can add quick formative questions as well in Edpuzzle. Students cannot skip over these either. I then use goformative in the classroom to do section checks after my students have completed problem sets in their groups.
So, a usual day in my classroom consists of an introduction with a very brief summary of the ideas presented in the lesson video they had watched as homework. Then, students work in groups on the problem set as I move through the classroom answering questions and checking in with students. Last, they complete the section checks on goformative.

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This is a great question, I am trying to convert my class of 8th Grade SS into a flipped learning experience. I am trying figure out some good ways to do so.

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When flipped learning occurs, it replaces my teaching with a video of me explaining a concept. I use Flipped Learning for GoFormatives to explain the reading or ideas and show good answers. Students then redo their Formatives after viewing the Flipped Learning. It saves me time from staying before or after school repeating my explanations over and over again. Also, I like to use Flipped Learning when I know I won’t be in the classroom; it gives students directions and feedback from me and makes my absence less chaotic and more productive.

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I also love the EdPuzzle will track how many times students have viewed the videos. Great way to check back in and see who is utilizing these tools.

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I agree! It’s almost like we are still there even on sub days! I especially love when I am able to hop on during the day and give feedback while they are working!

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I also like EDpuzzle because it records student responses and video completion.

I have created videos to take notes and for assembling Interactive Notebooks. Sometimes the "home"work is to collect data that we use the next day in class.

Non-math teachers could post a picture or a written prompt and have students either submit links to resources on the web or even fill out the K and W sections of a KWL. The next day in class, the resources and K statements could be viewed and the W questions could be discussed and further researched. Then the students could write a 3-5 paragraph essay about what they learned.

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I am a user of Classroom which I like because of its ease of use for me. I think it would be easy to integrate it into that format either using it on its own or putting it in a formative. However, it seems my attempts in the past have been met with " once the novelty is gone" so is the watching. How do I avoid that trap?

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I really love the idea of allowing students to do some prep work for a more engaging in-class activity! I can see how this could get them excited for the day ahead. It might even be fun to leave the next’s day activity as a mystery and allow them to anticipate it based on the items/info you are having them find!

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What a great point @Jason_Jorgensen - we definitely do have to make sure that it doesn’t become too routine that students get bored or lose focus on the goal of a flipped classroom. I think that by changing up the platform in which you use could be beneficial - stay tuned to our chat today if you would like to see more!

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Great idea! What about switching up the medium? Based on my knowledge of flipped learning (which is pretty limited), I know that flipped instruction is usually video…but what about using podcasts or interactive presentations (Prezis, ThingLinks) to switch up the mode of instruction once in a while? I’d be very interested to hear if anyone has tried that.

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The flipped learning model as evolved for me. It used to be watch a video and come to class ready to discuss what you watched and do questions based on what you saw. It is know more enriched with learning content still usually in video form but have give articles and other medium, but now dig deeper into student understanding with a variety of formative assessments that set up a game plan for instructional decisions and differentiated learning. It has more of a focus on independent learning with supports (peers, teacher, other sources) to help each student with their learning process. If you walked into my class you probably wouldn’t see me (especially at the front of the class) I’d probably be sitting at a table with a student or group of students having a discussion and you wouldn’t see a desk either.

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Thanks for the recommendation to use Edpuzzle @mxn12 to keep students on the right learning path. Many times when we have teacher trainings (like today) teachers do the same thing as students and try to skip through and miss important content.
Often “flipped” learning is cloning myself with video so that I can provide extra support to students who really need one on one time. It also looks like when students are in class but I am not. @chase.kirkpatrick I did not know “track how many times students have viewed the videos”.
I do a backwards flip :slight_smile: when I will be gone and the students will be at school. Students love it when they know I am “out there” on the internet watching them. They like to send me messages when others are off task. Do you think class would be flipped if the students have to prepare the lesson to teach their classmates? :):grinning: @david This year I plan to have students create podcasts and blogs - I just took a short teacher course on KQED which was very empowering. @d.vendramin I often also “disappear” in the room while I am chatting and working with individual students.

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What a great point! I think that it is great that you can really fine tune and develop your ideas that best fit your content and students!

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I have tried the occasional in-class flip. Students watch a video (sometimes EdPuzzle) at their own pace. The difficulty where I am is that there are still a good number of kids who do not have Internet at home, and/or do not have the time due to the activities and responsibilities at home.
But letting the video do the “talking” in class, I can focus on small groups, answer questions and work the room as kids are all at a different spot in the work.

:slight_smile:
Dawn

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Thanks for highlighting another way to benefit from a flipped classroom. I definitely agree! It is not always realistic that I can ask my 2nd graders to do their learning at home, but there are many approaches to try out where I can still flip some parts of our learning!

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Thanks for the input, Dean! Have you found that you are able to formatively assess students as they complete their “homework” so that you are able to adjust your instruction and learning activities that you have planned?

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@clsnyder-renfro

This is super cool! I wonder if you could use these mediums for flipped instruction as well (when they are home and learning the content on their own).

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Good point about the lack of technology presenting a barrier. Have you tried assigning articles/reading assignments instead of videos so that students can still learn the content at home?

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Definitely have been more efficient with making instructional decisions and taking the flow of class where it needs to be. Student confidence has also improved as they are able to get the feedback they need and able to learn at their own pace.

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