Why would you want to flip your classroom? What advantages are there?

Hi everyone! Happy Monday!

Throughout the week, @pflynn and I will be hosting a slow chat about Flipped Learning. Each day we will post a new question/topic! Whether you are an experienced flipper or someone thinking about trying it out this school year, we would love to hear your thoughts. Be sure to tune in throughout the week to learn more.

To kick it off, we’d love to open the discussion about why to flip. Why would you want to flip your classroom? What advantages are there?

@informed_members, @Certified_Educators

18%20AM

5 Likes

The standards have changed so much over the years that it doesn’t take long for students’ parents to hit their ‘mathematical ceiling’ as far as being able to help at home. My students stopped doing their homework because there was no one at home to help them. So, I flipped my classroom. What would normally be done as homework (at home) is now done in class… with the Math Expert (me) on hand to help answer any questions. My new homework contains only activities that students can do independently or with minimal parental help. (For example, they can watch a video and take notes. )

4 Likes

I have been flipping my Precalc classroom for about 7 years now. I find that it is really helpful to students that like to review topics prior to an assessment since they can rewatch the videos or to students who miss class either due to illness or extracurricular activities. I feel it is helpful to me because it allows me more time in the classroom to work one-on-one with my students, which, in turn, lets me get to know my students better. In my non-flipped classroom, I would go over homework questions and lecture for almost the entire period. There would be a few times where I would have my students try an example problem and move through the room to help, but I wouldn’t really have much time to talk to individual students. Now, the majority of my class is working with students and talking with them. It has made such a difference!

2 Likes

I work with English Language Learners. Flipping my class provides my students more time to go over the materials. If I have the information on a video they are able to stop it and rewind it as often as necessary. It takes away the time constraints found during a typical period. Other advantages include:
*having the materials readily available for students who are absent especially those on long-term absences.

*students can no longer say I didn’t have the assignment

4 Likes

I agree! Especially when it comes to math, there are so many strategies and methods we teach that parents didn’t learn while in school themselves.

3 Likes

What a great use of instructional time! Also love the idea of using for review prior to an assessment!

2 Likes

What a great way to support language acquisition!

2 Likes

Agreed! Also, I have found that they are more apt to go back and listen to what you said on the video which is a plus when you are trying to have them practice a concept at home.

5 Likes

I have semi flipped my science class. My astronomy unit is a self guided journey, much like a pick your own adventure book. My students pick a topic to work through and through videos,etc… they work their way through that topic and when finished move on to the next. The advantage to this is that it gives my students immediate ownership in the learning, it also allows them to feel like they are in control of what they learn and when. They work through all of our astronomy standards without ever really realizing that I am guiding them from behind the scenes.

5 Likes

Great point about students being absent. I hadn’t thought of this before and can see how it allows students to get caught up to speed and “flips” the script!

3 Likes

I use a semi-flipped setting in my science classroom. I find the idea of students taking notes from my presentation during class time is not as beneficial as them getting hands on learning during class time. They also have the opportunity to go back and review material as much and as often as they want before assessments.

4 Likes

Great advantage to flipping for sure! It is amazing how much more you can get accomplished during the day!

2 Likes

I have been flipping my high school math classes for the last 7 years, and will be starting my 8th year. After 15 years of teaching, the main reason I started flipping my classes was because I was bored. I figured if I was bored with the way class ran, the students had to be bored. After just months of flipping, I realized that there were far more advantages to why one should flip their classes.

First, I know my students way better than I ever did before. There was time during class for me to build community and get to know my students. There was time in class for my students to get to know each other as well.

Second, I realized that I was getting almost 100% homework completion, because now the students were doing the “easy” stuff at home, (either watching a video or taking notes from a reading) and doing the hard stuff in front of me where I can help them. No longer do parents have to understand upper level math concepts, and no longer do students say they can’t do the work because they didn’t understand.

Third, I was getting through the material much quicker, because I no longer needed “review” days prior to tests. With flipping, I was learning faster what my students didn’t understand, and addressing those misunderstandings earlier. I was able to do formative assessments EVERY SINGLE class period.

Fourth, all lessons can be reviewed and rewatched as much as the students need. The students take ownership of their learning.

Although I thought it was because I was bored, there were far more advantages as you can read that crept up from flipping.

8 Likes

Amen, Sista Shai! You nailed it!

2 Likes

I actually wrote a little blog about this. Flippity Do Dah!
Mostly, I think flipping comes down to getting more time face to face with students were higher Bloom’s activities can happen. For me, I teach inner city students who are far behind in overall academics. The struggle is real. If there is a way for them to get anything done outside of regular class time to build background knowledge and experience then it is freaking amazing! I try to flip the heck out of anything I can. This means everyone may not participate because of technology, resources, having to work to support their family etc. Nonetheless, I just put as many opportunities in my students paths as I can to support their journey of learning.

3 Likes

This is totally what I do. I also have scavenger hunt activities. Something just about any kid could do but it will take a little effort on their part. These are things that should not cost any money but we need a lot of to do a project and such in class. i.e. plastic bags (to cover shoes in the garden or make mats for the homeless), paper egg cartons (to plant seeds in), Cereal boxes ( to learn how to read a nutrition label, make patterns for sewing, make science projects like viewers for the eclipse, make shadow boxes etc.) newspapers (for reading, black out poetry, paper mache) and the golden ticket Box Tops for Education! These are not necessarily academic, but it helps teach students goal setting, follow through, resourcefulness, empowerment, and service since they contribute to class success.
I do this too and my students really appreciate it. @loliveira “I have the information on a video they are able to stop it and rewind it as often as necessary”
It is important @masjones to find ways to give “ownership in the learning” to our students.
@mxn12 We have a lot of absenteeism and the videos empower students and free teacher time for constant review.

5 Likes
  1. Relegate reading/viewing time to home frees you as a teacher from having to explain and lecture in class + students can learn on their own time, especially if you give reading/viewing assignments well before they are due.

  2. On their own time, students can rewind videos or re-read parts that they did not understand instead of waiting for you to “spoon feed” them the information in class.

  3. Ideally, you can go directly to applying the knowledge in class or make/answer questions as a whole class or in small groups.

  4. More responsibility and ownership on the students.

  5. More interesting class time, better use of teacher and students’ talents in class.

  6. Students who have understood the material can be paired with students who have not quite understood it - students can become assistant-teachers in a sense.

  7. Teacher role from “chalk and talk” to coach/support.

:slight_smile:

3 Likes

Great point about the much more efficient use of time!:slight_smile:

2 Likes

Sounds fantastic @masjones! How long does it take you to set up a whole unit before they start? Do you put it all on Google Classroom or online some other way? :slight_smile:

2 Likes

It took quite awhile, honestly. I did use a lot of assignments that I already had - edited and modified to be self guided. I did assign through Google Classroom using the feature of assigning to individual students. The logistics of grading was a nightmare, though. Instead of having one assignment turned in by all of my students all in one day I had multiple assignments being turned in constantly as kids finished up. I know the total amount of grading ended up being the same but it seemed like a lot more because it was constant.

All that said, it was totally worth it!

2 Likes